Period of Transition

 

I’m still working on new material, but I’m also reveling in the joy of letter-writing once more. It’s home to me and much of this web-log shows that very easily. The entries are often as though I am writing letters to the known and unknown people reading it.

I’m putting together another retrospective for June of 2017. It’s turning out to be very long. I’m not really worried about that because there are some podcasts out there I have listened to over the years that can reach up to 2-3 hours in length. This one I am creating shouldn’t be that long, but I’m not worried about the length because, from what I’ve gathered, a lot of people online like to waste time which means they have plenty of time to spend on something worth listening to, even if they have to pause and come back later to hear it.

Meanwhile I’m viewing the First Year of Dark Shadows. My husband and I were still in the Bill Malloy area for Memorial Day Weekend. In the earlier part that still shows Bill Malloy alive, Carolyn Stoddard meets Burke Devlin at The Collinsport Inn coffee shop to see Burke reading a book. I made a joke that, since Burke Devlin’s initial story is based on an Alexander Dumas tale, that he was reading “The Count of Monte Cristo”.

As it turned out the book Burke Devlin was reading was:

Count of Monte Cristo

The Count of Monte Cristo!

HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA!

I sure burst out laughing. I had to explain a bit of why, and how my joke was spot-on, to my sweetheart.

I believe the writers might have wanted to educate the audience about what they were viewing. If that sunk in with anyone, who knows?

On my own I am going through the introduction of Laura Murdoch Collins. It’s an absolute gas! The metaphors are so blatant they have her hailing from Phoenix, Arizona, and people are lighting matches and staring into them intently.

For my Laura time period viewing there is a lot of soapy silliness. Burke getting a big smooch from Carolyn and then wandering over to the Morgan cottage to try the same thing with Laura. Roger bursting in with a shotgun and staking some claim while Laura complains they are behaving like they did ten years ago.

I don’t why but I really like this Laura Collins! She’s got horrible intentions, I know, I know. But she isn’t blustering around with a rifle and screaming at people. She was also averse to Burke’s wooing and rightly so. The dude’s already courting another blonde in the family. Gross!

But then we have this lovely morning with Victoria Winters and Mrs. Collins. Something about it is pleasant and agreeable.

Victoria and Laura2

Miss Winters tells David’s mother how she finds David to be sensitive and more intelligent than most children. Laura’s motherly appeal looks genuine. I know… it’s probably nothing near that, I know, but the sense of, well… warmth, without exactly meaning to make a pun of these things, is right there. (happy smile)

And I got some goodies about Laura being in a sanatorium holding on to the locket Roger gave her on their wedding night, which is a family heirloom and contains a lock of David’s baby hair. Many significant details of the outside world to get her through her time of mental duress.

Plenty of lovely scenes at the Evans Cottage which is absolutely wonderful considering how much I care about Sam and Maggie, scary painting possessing Sam or not. ❤

Also various empty moments witnessing a telephone ringing in a vacant room as Sheriff Patterson desperately dials numbers from a phone booth. Funniest bit was Roger and Burke going machismo at each other in The Blue Whale as Sam gets to be the intimate audience to the whole male-posturing scenario, which Carolyn later interrupts in her breezy way. Sam ends the evening to leave by saying, “I think I’ve filled my quota…” No kidding, Pop! XD


But for the serious, the upcoming podcast will break down what’s up with me, going through a few more old episodes of The Pit and various means of putting it together, similar to the last retrospective but with more details as the episodes increased in length.

Moreover, the understanding that my addressing the internet and 21st century gadgets creating flawed faculties in society at large has always been important. All the arguing over the years at me to share my very hard work without feedback was extremely nonsensical, while encouraging depletion of social skills and wherewithal.

There are so many things that have happened that I did not condone and, in good conscious, I never can approve of. If society at large is regressing into laziness and grade school mentality, while many still harness the angst of adolescence and adulthood, there is nothing to encourage about that. It is like training people to become autistic and we have enough work to do with people who are already born autistic. A brother of mine has autism and is low-functioning. He was born that way. It is not a condition that is easy to handle or care for. It is a full and overtime job. I do not wish this disability for anyone and I am against allowing others to sink into such a state by environment.

Whatever disabilities one might have should not exist as an excuse but a challenge. One might consider me disabled because I do not drive. However, I live with that challenge on a daily basis and am extremely grateful when I receive the help of transportation that I cannot provide for myself.

Has anyone questioned if I was given the proper guidance and instruction to reach that form of “independence”? Do drivers recall how very much it takes to gain that freedom so many adhere as a duty instead? Many people are involved in that privilege for an individual to become a licensed driver. No one person becomes a motorist on their own. It takes community and several exhausting hoops to jump through.

Attempting to become a driver myself taught me something very important, indeed.

Independence is very often an illusion. Human beings are dependent on each other.

There is no getting around this obvious fact of our lives.

Period.

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3 thoughts on “Period of Transition

  1. Hey! I know I’m five days late, but here are my thoughts: First, let me comment that although that is a black and white still, I love Laura’s outfit! I can just imagine the colors on it. Second, I never got far into the Pheonix Laura episodes, but that was kind if endearing to know that Roger gave her a cherished gift (although both parents have different thoughts about their son–one thinks of him as her sacrifice for immortality and the other doesn’t think much of him, except as a “little monster” (I heard him refer to David as that on the first episode, if I’m not mistaken.). Finally, I agree with you on the state of independence of oneself. I was not prepared by my adult figures on how to handle finances or had much of a push or guidance in driving and relaxing behind the wheel myself, but I do have a foothold on my finances now, and after I move, I’m going to sign up for adult driver’s education. So, yes, I get it entirely!

  2. morlock13 says:

    Aye! Someone tried to tell me he got his driver’s training and license all on his own and I have had to shake my head. Whatever means he was using could not have been (entirely) legal, and it was a very poor example to make in the claims of being able to do things all on one’s own. (When it comes down to it, he could not have manufactured whatever vehicle he was learning on and later drove, nor the people involved in even creating the plastic coating on the license he acquired, etc.)

    As for the Laura, Roger and David trio, yep! There has to be some sentimentality and love in there somewhere for it all to have happened. And that gives a bit of relief before we must return to the tension and endless suspense.

    Some of the later bits I’ve watched have that very circular dialogue of arguing, whether it’s Carolyn and Burke, or Laura and Elizabeth. That brings me back to Episode 7 of The Pit where Barnabas & Maggie notice it felt the wind had changed direction after Wadsworth arrived, and Barnabas expressed, “It seemed like everyone on the estate and beyond, we all had these inanely indefatigable conversations upon a single point.”

    But the wardrobe is quite classic! When I watch Laura I definitely wonder what colour her dresses are as well. (Knowing the blatant metaphors they keep using, I’m sure if they had colour film at the time it would probably have been variations of orange, yellow and red. Whatever would bring flames to the viewer’s awareness.

    Good to hear your updates and accomplishments, thank you! ^_^

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